James DeRuvo

Staff Writer

James has a multi-faceted career that spans radio, film and publishing. A writer about the technology in the video industry for over 20 years, James is also an award winning film director, having garnered a Telly Award for his short film "Searching for Inspiration." He's also worked as a producer of many talk radio programs in Los Angeles with topics ranging from entertainment to travel to technology. He’s a private pilot, podcaster, screenwriter, and dad.

Articles by James DeRuvo

Google Maps Now Has 3D Immersive Views of Famous Landmarks

Google has been developing a 3D Immersive View feature for Google Maps that will provide a bird's-eye view of notable landmarks. The new feature is being rolled out to mobile users, on both Android and iOS platforms, and includes 3D images of nearly 100 famous landmarks around the world.

dan rios

Photographer Donates a Million Photos of San Diego to Local Library

A local San Diego newspaper photographer has donated his entire collection of photographs taken during his career to a local university library. Dan Rios studied photography at a local community college, before working at the Escondido Advocate and the North County Times newspapers from 1968 to 2001.

TTArtisan’s New 50mm f/2 Full-Frame Lens Costs Only $69

TTArtisan has announced a new 50mm f/2 full-frame manual focus lens. Though not the fastest “nifty fifty” in the company arsenal, the standard focal length lens has a natural viewing angle and the company says it has a fast enough aperture to provide high performance in low light.

Mount Vesuvius

Tourist Ignores Warnings, Falls Into Volcano While Taking a Selfie

An American tourist has been rescued after falling into the crater of an active volcano trying to take a selfie. The tourist had taken a closed-off path up the face of Mount Vesuvius, in Italy, and had climbed down into the crater in a bid to recover his mobile phone which he had dropped.

slo

What a Shape Charge Explosion Looks Like at 5 Million FPS

The Slow Mo Guys have captured a shaped charge explosion at five million frames per second, showing its path of destruction as it tears through a variety of items. The explosions were captured using a high-speed camera that filters out the color in order to preserve the detail of the image.